Groundwater, with brief forms

My work is a lot about groundwater. This example of Stiefo (Aufbauschrift) shows what Wikipedia says about it:

Introduction to the German Wikipedia page “Grundwasser”.

Here I used some brief forms. Grundschrift (basic level) already offers the possibilty to define your own abbreviations for common expressions, by writing a 1 step high consonant at 3 step size. I use the 3 step W for „Wasser“ (“water“). I create additional expressions by adding further letters, e. g. „Grundwasser“ (“groundwater”) by a g prefix, „Grundwasserleiter“ (“aquifer”) by a eit suffix:

3 step W for „Wasser“ (“water”); extensions for „Grundwasser“ (“groundwater”) and „Grundwasserleiter“ (“aquifer”). Characteristic elements are highlighted in orange.

“Standard Stiefo” makes almost no use of loops in clockwise direction (except the point-size loop for -lich). I use a half-step clockwise loop on the baseline for -ologie (-ology). Similarly, the raised loop (not used here) means -graphie (-graphy). The one-step clockwise loop abbreviates the various forms of „halten“ according to the stem vowel (hold, contain, stop, etc.).

Half- and full-step clockwise loops.

The lowered (i/ü/y position) letter h abbreviates „hier“ (“here”) in Aufbauschrift (advanced level). I also use it for „hin“ (“towards”) and for the prefix hydr(o)-. With this I can write „Hydrogeologie“ (“hydrogeology) quite concisely.

Brief form for hydro- and examples „Hydrogeologie“ (“hydrogeology”), „Hydraulik“ (“hydraulics”).

Teeline status

After a long hiatus I’m starting to practice Teeline again, because it surely would be useful for the English words I come across at work, which are clumsy to write in Stiefo.

I have not written Teeline for a very long time and I am not very good at it anyway.
I have not written Teeline for a very long time and I am not very good at it anyway. (Written in Teeline at a very beginner’s level.)

You can read this text in the German version of this post in Stiefo, for comparison.

“Advanced” Teeline: first word groupings

I’m in the middle of unit 5 of the “Teeline Gold Course Book”, where the first “advanced” features of Teeline are introduced: word groupings. Common phrases like “I am”, “You will be”, but even “We should be able to” are written as a single outline. (To be exact, phrases with “… be able to” are written in two parts: word grouping and a full vowel a close to it.)

Practicing word groupings.
Practicing word groupings.

Continue reading “Advanced” Teeline: first word groupings

Violin

A short excerpt from the Simple English Wikipedia article about the violin. Embarassingly, I forgot “is played” in the first line. 🙁

The violin is a string instrument which is played with a bow. It has four strings.[1] The strings are usually tuned to the notes G, D, A, and E. It is held between the left collar bone (near the shoulder) and the chin. Different notes are made by fingering with the left hand while bowing with the right.
The violin is a string instrument which is played with a bow. It has four strings.[1] The strings are usually tuned to the notes G, D, A, and E. It is held between the left collar bone (near the shoulder) and the chin. Different notes are made by fingering with the left hand while bowing with the right.
I’m looking forward to learning the abbreviation for -ing

Joining R and G

In all Teeline texts I’ve seen so far, the letter G is joined to R with a sharp bend backwards to form the head of the G. Have a look at the word “garage” (the Teeline Gold Course Book authors seem very fond of that one…) below, number 1.

Joining R and G: 1) standard way, 2) my smooth version
Joining R and G: 1) standard way, 2) my smooth version

It would be much nicer to write a smooth connection, as in number 2.  This happens quite often to me, as the Teeline G is similar to the German Stiefo M, which is joined smoothly to previous letters.

Am I missing a problem here, some conflict or potential for confusion? One thing I’m thinking about: if the R is not completely straight but gently curves into the G, it looks like an upwards-L.

Mooning Pluto

Here’s the first paragraph of Phil Plait’s article “Mooning Pluto” on Bad Astronomy in Teeline:

Pluto is an interesting little world. Smaller than our Moon, it still boasts no fewer than five moons discovered so far. The first, Charon, was discovered in 1978, but the second through fifth were found just a few years ago using Hubble data.
Pluto is an interesting little world. Smaller than our Moon, it still boasts no fewer than five moons discovered so far. The first, Charon, was discovered in 1978, but the second through fifth were found just a few years ago using Hubble data.

I’m not really happy about how I wrote “Pluto”: Joining upwards L and T is awkward (outline 1, below). I should have writen it disjoined, I think (outline 2). But then, I’m afraid this may indicate some suffix I do not know about yet. The proper way would be to use the normal L, to which T can be easily joined (outline 3). However, this outline would hang very low below the writing line.

How to write “Pluto”?
How to write “Pluto”? 1, 2, or 3?